Teaching English to Hungarians

Of Hungarians and their idiosyncrasies:

In a land not so far away, in what they say to be the middle of Europe, live the Hungarians. As you may have heard…

…They boast an impressive number of Nobel laureates per capita – and will tell you that almost everything was invented by Hungarians. Or someone part-Hungarian…

…They claim to have founded Hollywood – and they will always spot at least one Hungarian name at the end of films.

…They eat cold fruit soup – and will make you have some.

…And only 37% of them say that they speak a foreign language – at least according to 2016 EU statistics.

Teaching Hungarians and teaching in Hungary is an adventure on its own right. Just like with any foreign culture, shocks and surprises pave the way to educational (and linguistic) success. Then again, if you didn’t like that you wouldn’t have become an English teacher, right? So join us for an afternoon to discover what makes Hungarians some of the most challenging, yet rewarding students and what could be the key to their language skills (and hearts).

Teaching Hungarians

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Step 1 – Setting a time and date

DON’T plan lunch time lessons (we have a proper lunch, no sandwich & crisp combo thank you very much), DON’T even dream of a lesson on Friday afternoon, DON’T hope to make a fortune in August, and DO check long weekends ahead (first summary issued for 2018 appeared in August 2017. We love long weekends).

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Step 2 – Being on time

A 5-minute delay is no delay, but beyond that you’re officially running late. We’re neither Germans nor Italians.

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Step 3 – How are you?

Don’t ask ‘How are you?’ unless you’re prepared to deal with an honest and often somewhat depressing answer (complaining is a national sport). Also, make sure you teach the 3rd conditional asap. We are a nation of conditionals, especially of the third kind.

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Step 4 – Grammar

Rule no.1.: there is no logic to English. Rule no.2.: Hungarians are conditioned to fear tenses and think that that’s the alpha and omega of English grammar. Rule no 3.: brace yourself as complaints start pouring in regarding “short words” which brings us to…

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Step 5 – Vocabulary

Hungarians love long words. The longer the better. Prepositions and whatnot make sentences illogical. Also these strict rules of word order are horrible. Why not throw all words in the air and let them randomly find their place in the sentence? Oh and those multi-meaning 2 in 1 (3 in 1) words… Bah! Decide if experience is élmény or tapasztalat and name it accordingly. Why have one word for two different concepts?! Last but not least (but that’s a universal woe isn’t it?) spelling. And pronunciation. Not veri vell szenk jú.

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Step 6 – Listening

We dub everything, we don’t like subtitles, don’t try to talk us into subtitles. Also, English people don’t speak properly and can’t pronounce anything clearly. End of discussion.

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Step 7 – Speaking

Oh dear! We might make a mistake. That would be the end of the world. We were taught so when we got back our school tests full of red exclamation marks and corrections. Dear Lord, save us! We shall not open our mouth in case we make a mistake. Oh you say, people SPEAK languages? Too bad, not Hungarians.

Trainer

Judit is a passionate polyglot whose personal mission is to share the joy of discovering the diversity of humankind through languages, books and food. Born in Hungary, she spent part of her childhood in Germany, attended an American kindergarten and grew up with Italian cousins, so by the end of high school there was no doubt that her further studies would have something to do with languages and cultures. In her second year at the University of Cambridge she realised that focusing on Arabic, Spanish and Portuguese as part of Middle Eastern Studies just simply wouldn’t be enough for her, therefore she quickly transferred to Linguistics, followed by an MPhil Distinction in Applied Linguistics and English. Originally, she planned to return to Hungary only for a year to gain hands-on language teaching experience before starting her DPhil research at Oxford – that was five years ago. While she hasn’t given up on her academic ambitions, she simply fell in love with teaching English and Hungarian as a foreign language at GLOBUS.

Time and date:

4 pm – 6 pm on 11th October 2017

(Judit’s 60-minute workshop will be followed by a 60-minute forum for exchanging experiences led by two seasoned native English teachers)

Location:

GLOBUS Corporate Language Training,

1085 Budapest,
József krt. 21.

Normal price:

7800 Ft

Discount price:

3000 Ft*

*The discount applies to GLOBUS teachers. If you wish to become a GLOBUS teacher, send us your CV, pass our interview and get a discount.

Deadline: 29th October

Registration

Contact details

Invoice details

Success Stories

Use our solutions to find answers to your language training-related questions.

Quality guarantees

We undertake contractual quality guarantees to provide results which live up to your expectations.

Contact

Registered office:
1085 Budapest, József krt. 21.

Telephone:
+36 1/792-0202

E-mail:
titkarsag@globusonline.hu

Success Stories

Use our solutions to find answers to your language training-related questions.

Quality guarantees

We undertake contractual quality guarantees to provide results which live up to your expectations.

Contact

Registered office:
1085 Budapest, József krt. 21.

Telephone:
+36 1/792-0202

E-mail:
titkarsag@globusonline.hu